Australia’s top predator

Five thousand years ago, whilst writing was being invented, Stonehenge being built and Egyptian dynasties rising, Dingos were being brought to Australia by Indonesian sailors. Dingos are Australia’s wild dogs, thought to be a descendant of (domesticated) dogs in Asia.

Whilst Dingoes are found through most of mainland Australia, they are absent from Tasmania. The biggest threat to dingoes are cross breeding with dogs. Reason why it is very common to see dingo-like dogs in Australian suburbs and truly pure dingoes are extremely rare. Except in Fraser island where dogs are not allowed into the island.

Dingoes are considered magic animals – they are Australia’s top predator, the equivalent of Africa’s lion, and thus dingoes are responsible for keeping Australian biodiversity intact. Dingoes are the only chance against introduced predators like feral cats and foxes. Once the dingo is gone, poisons are all that will be left against these intruders.

As the top predator of Australia, Dingoes help keep wallaby and kangaroo populations at bay as these marsupials constitute the majority of the diet of Dingoes. Being such an adaptive animal, dingoes are most active at dawn and dusk, when their prey is also active.

The two most common myths about dingoes and their counter facts are:

1. “Pure” dingoes don’t bark. Dingoes do bark, but not like domestic dogs. Dingoes’ barks are generally harsher, and given in short bursts. Only bark when alarmed.

2. “Pure” dingoes are all ginger. However, there is genetic evidence that dingoes’ coats can also be black, black and tan, black and white, or plain white.

If one would inadvertently come into close contact with a Dingo, one must defend themselves aggressively.

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