Australian invasion

Walking Galicia through the Camino de Santiago gives the opportunity to see endemic vegetation and trees like chestnut and oaks trees. They contrast with the introduced Australian species of the eucaliptus. Much like the heated debate that has been foregoing for years in the Spanish country. Eucaliptus was introduced on the XIX century and since then it has adapted and spread to the Galician soil. The controversy is between the paper industry and the ecologists fighting for better forestal planning as this foreign species threatens to kill this beauty.

Follow the yellow arrow

The most famous of the trails to Santiago de Compostela is the French way which starts in St. Jean de Pied du Port and expands 800kms.

The French way comes in to Melide through the village of Santa María do Leboreiro. In the Calixtinus Code of the XII century, it appears as Campus Leporarius, which means “field of hares”.

Along the way, yellow arrows and scallop shells mark the turns, paths and direction of the Camino. The signs can be seen everywhere: on sidewalks, walls, trees, rocks and tile dotted throughout the routes.

Pilgrim’s insignia

It has been more than a thousand years, that pilgrims have walked the many kilometers and many ways that lead to Santiago de Compostela, seeking penance, forgiveness, solitude, enlightenment, and some, adventure.

The scallop shell has long been the symbol of the Camino de Santiago (St. James’ Way). This shell is commonly found in the shores of Galicia and often pilgrims wear or attach them to backpacks to show that they are walkers on the trail. The origins of this tradition is uncertain. Some say it was given to the early pilgrims to prove they had reached Santiago de Compostela. Others say that additionally it was given to pilgrims for their walk back home to be used as a drinking device in lakes, rivers, waterfalls.

Whatever its beginings, all pilgrims use it nowadays and are easily identifiable than the hundreds of tourists in this area of the world.